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Home »  Photo Prints » Aviation-NASA aircrafts-Prototypes » S04909
 
Ref S04909 : X-1A in flight with flight data superimposed
    



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DIMENSIONS High Definition PRINT BACKLIT*
40 x 60 cm
15.7 x 23.6 inches
23.00 € 20.70 €
125.00 €
50 x 75 cm
19.7 x 29.5 inches
29.90 € 26.91 €
140.00 €
60 x 90 cm
23.6 x 35.4 inches
45.00 € 40.50 €
170.00 €
80 x 120 cm
31.5 x 47.2 inches
75.00 €
220.00 €
100 x 150 cm
39.4 x 59.1 inches
109.00 €
290.00 €

*Backlit is a translucent matter to apply in front of a neon light
Thme : Aviation-NASA aircrafts-Prototypes

Description :

This photo of the X-1A includes graphs of the flight data from Maj. Charles E. Yeager's Mach 2.44 flight on December 12, 1953. (This was only a few days short of the 50th anniversary of the Wright brothers' first powered flight.) After reaching Mach 2.44, then the highest speed ever reached by a piloted aircraft, the X-1A tumbled completely out of control. The motions were so violent that Yeager cracked the plastic canopy with his helmet. He finally recovered from a inverted spin and landed on Rogers Dry Lakebed. Among the data shown are Mach number and altitude (the two top graphs). The speed and altitude changes due to the tumble are visible as jagged lines. The third graph from the bottom shows the G-forces on the airplane. During the tumble, these twice reached 8 Gs or 8 times the normal pull of gravity at sea level. (At these G forces, a 200-pound human would, in effect, weigh 1,600 pounds if a scale were placed under him in the direction of the force vector.) Producing these graphs was a slow, difficult process. The raw data from on-board instrumentation recorded on oscillograph film. Human computers then reduced the data and recorded it on data sheets, correcting for such factors as temperature and instrument errors. They used adding machines or slide rules for their calculations, pocket calculators being 20 years in the future.

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